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5 Style Lessons Every Groomsman Needs to Know

5 Style Lessons Every Groomsman Needs to Know

 

We are the suits we wear. The only question is whether you own it or not.

No, this is not about literal ownership. In practical terms, you might have bought the suit. In fact, you might have given a fat buck for it, but it still doesn’t mean that you own it. The suit, as it is, might not represent who you are. It has to be the natural extension of you. If it’s not, it’s nowhere more evident than on a wedding day.

In order to look truly confident as a groomsman, here are 5 style lessons you need to learn first.

 

Be yourself

It sounds cheap, doesn’t it? It’s one of those placeholder phrases people use to say something when they have nothing to say. Well, in this context, it is the most crucial aspect of your style. You can’t choose a suit before knowing what makes you feel comfortable.

Let’s use a simple example – you either generally opt to wear simple clothes, monochromatic and light, or you like to channel your inner peacock and dress up in vogue to catch the eye of everyone in the room. This should, of course, be reflected in your choice of the men’s wedding suits.

All in all, your first planning steps would be starting to prep yourself as early as possible and learning the types of fabrics for your suit.

Practice makes it perfect

As we’ve mentioned, you have to start preparing early. Buying the right suit will leave you with enough time to practice wearing it. This is a crucial stage in “acquiring your style” because you have to feel comfortable in the new suit. It has to look like you own it with absolute conviction.

Try to walk around a private room in the suit, at least three times for several hours. It’s crucial to have a mirror in the room, watch your own movement and test out sitting in it.

There’s a lot that can be communicated through movement, so try to modify it to look natural in the suit. After all, mannerism tells a lot about your personality.

Choose the right type

Here’s your “to be or not to be” moment. Once you choose the type of suit, you have to be sure it’s the right fit in every sense. If you follow the two lessons above, you’ll probably be fairly certain by this point, but let’s talk about it concretely.

Before you even start thinking about the speech and the stag party, you have to choose one out of countless variants of groomsman suits.

Tuxedo is a classic, but it’s not merely a gimmick – if you don’t feel comfortable in formal wear, skip it. A three-piece is a good middle ground, it’s a flexible type of a suit so it’s easy to blend it in with the general aesthetic of the wedding and convince the other guys to follow suit. Just remember never to wear a tie with a short-sleeve shirt!

Your constitution will make some of the decisions for you

Now, we can go on and talk about how weed will make you sweat if the wedding is in the summer, and how blue compliments every complexion, but the truth is – color and material might be chosen for you by another factor. Your constitution.

Heavier fabrics will look good on the tall and skinny, light colors will make you appear bulky, muscular men should be fitted with lightweight fabrics and dark colors, and vertical stripes will complement both short and stout.

Decide on the dress code

Every man of style takes initiative. Therefore, if you have chosen the perfect suit for yourself, communicate this to the rest of the wedding invitees, and do this as early as possible. Maybe your choice is exactly what clicks with everyone else.

In a way, you need the suit to reflect your own character, however, you don’t want to stand out from the crowd in a jarring manner. It’s a hallmark of bad taste.

 

Following these lessons can appear as a daunting task – there are a lot of small details you’ll come across as the preparations unfold. The most important lesson, in the end, is to make yourself feel as comfortable as you can. This is the only way you’ll be yourself and, therefore, ooze confidence as you stand beside your friend on his happiest day.